An object from another universe: Venice’s mountain of leaning sculptures

Written by By Jack Palmer, CNN Hong Kong Contributors It turns out that a signboard in the “real world” can be much like a giant sticking plaster — which is why sliding tackles have…

An object from another universe: Venice's mountain of leaning sculptures

Written by By Jack Palmer, CNN Hong Kong Contributors

It turns out that a signboard in the “real world” can be much like a giant sticking plaster — which is why sliding tackles have to be carefully applied.

Leaning frames, which are one of the few ways to stand upright in Hong Kong, are common sights for pedestrians in the city’s densely packed subways.

All of which calls to mind the iconic rock sculpture in Venice, Italy — a 500-year-old motif stretching across seas and continents.

Leaning sculptures in Venice, Italy Credit: Action Press/UIG via Getty Images

1 / 21 – “The Judgment of Nuremberg” by The Brecht Club, Nuremberg, Germany Credit: Ralf Domaguh / Barnehau gallery

Although the sculpture, created in 1939 by German artist Georg Baselitz, was meant to symbolize Germany’s “excessiveness” during World War II, the responsibility does not lie solely with the German government.

Despite initially being conceived as a critique of the persecution of the Jewish community, the work has since been viewed as a collective commemoration of the Nazi’s successes.

Conversations around The Judgment of Nuremberg have resurfaced over the last few years, with a new exhibition centering on the work presented at Germany’s BMW Museum in 2016.

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