How the crew of the new ZPS module of the International Space Station has been preparing for spaceflight

The pods are built to withstand particles suspended from space’s thin atmosphere. So the crew members have to take into account contamination concerns, as the jars (called “garbage compacterators”) don’t return to Earth for…

How the crew of the new ZPS module of the International Space Station has been preparing for spaceflight

The pods are built to withstand particles suspended from space’s thin atmosphere. So the crew members have to take into account contamination concerns, as the jars (called “garbage compacterators”) don’t return to Earth for inspection.

Michela Figueiredo, a pilot from Brazil, and Japan’s Takuya Onishi, an astronaut, started their trip to the space station with the ZPS 4 trip from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The ZPS module will remain aboard the ISS for three months. The science that goes on in space requires careful attention to detail, especially as it evolves new ways to study vital signs in microgravity. The mission will allow researchers to figure out which sensory processes occur in a different way in a zero-gravity environment than they do on Earth.

I was able to access the external equipment because my research engineer was able to manipulate the lasers and change the power. — Michela Figueiredo

Two other of the modules in the ZPS 4 arrived in July. They include the Matron helmet, a device used to test sports performance and fatigue, and the Biocraft life support system. The goal of these projects is to carry out what are called microgravity microsurgery and immunosuppressive tests to investigate disease processes. Before the launch, crews tested the Matron helmet in a 50-second high-intensity light test to simulate a space environment that tests some of the helmet’s capabilities.

“The trailer is full of products that can bring tangible medical benefits to humans, but during and in the past there has been the drawback of this universe being very impenetrable, inaccessible,” said Figueiredo. “The goal of these products is to have something which can work in a little while. The mission is to continue this research process and find the best way of bringing the result of it to the outside of society.”

Read the full story at The Guardian.

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