Republican Congressman Bill Kristol On Intensive Vaccine Research And The Debate Around “Tris”

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip. With the former CDC Director and Dr. Chris Chase from Sypris Solutions sharing their thoughts on what make up “Tris,” the organic yeast found in one of…

Republican Congressman Bill Kristol On Intensive Vaccine Research And The Debate Around “Tris”

Play Audio Clip Listen to audio clip.

With the former CDC Director and Dr. Chris Chase from Sypris Solutions sharing their thoughts on what make up “Tris,” the organic yeast found in one of the most common and misunderstood ingredient in vaccines.

Listen below:

In an effort to create vaccines with higher levels of success and lower possible safety risks, several pharmaceutical companies have since begun researching strains of DNA and yeast for the ingredients they are using in their vaccines. One example is the germ that causes infection and often kills millions of people worldwide each year – Tromethamine (also known as Troufaxin or Tris). Tris-capoxide is one of the many things that comprise T-NGL, an organic biofilm found in more than 80% of tris vaccines. Tris-capoxide was first discovered in 1864 at the Yale School of Medicine by scientists Pierre Digman and Robert Huguenard. After further investigation, it was found that tris-capoxide would help stabilize the vaccine if used in combination with an antigens (antigens are the substance on the vaccine label) and insulin.

As director of the Center for Pharmaceutical Safety and Innovation at New York University Langone Medical Center, Dr. Chris Chase has found safety concerns surrounding a recent study by Robert Lustig of the University of California, San Francisco showing that T-NGL isolates can carry microbes that replicate more quickly (compared to unpollinated T-NGL) when put to bed, so much so that the T-NGL could potentially go undetected as medical waste.

“Tris is a powder and can be refrigerated at room temperature. It needs to be kept separate from the rest of the storage material at all times. There are several steps to cleaning and preserving tris-capoxide in a laboratory setting. Unfortunately, it’s also ideal for nefarious purposes,” said Chase.

Chase runs Syntria Solutions, a biotechnology company that develops and deploys FDA-approved methods of microbial isolation and the safety and efficacy of plant based adjuvants as a means to provide clinicians, researchers and companies with biofilm-solvent adjuvants to enhance vaccine’s efficacy and safety. Syntria Solutions’ active ingredient is T-NGL, found in Tris.

Chase, along with Dr. Bill Zachman, Tromethamine researcher and Director of Tromethamine for Sypris Solutions (leading the effort to produce cultured T-NGL at a 300-nanometer size), discovered that tris can be stored at room temperature and mild heat and is safe for purposes of safe storage, free inoculation, and the preparation of sterile pharmaceuticals.

Sypris Solutions has been working diligently to improve the performance of the world’s most widely used vaccines, including Tris, the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a vast majority of vaccines used in developing countries and low-income countries. T-NGL is one of the many safe, effective additives that are necessary for vaccines to be safe and effective.

Chase explains, “T-NGL is used in tris vaccines such as swine influenza or cholera vaccines but also in some shingles vaccines. Syntria Solutions has been working to develop a full T-NGL rubidium for sustained stability and reduction of its microbial spores in response to safety concerns. We will continue to seek out new and innovative ways to discover innovative ways to incorporate T-NGL into vaccines.”

MORE INFO:

Teledoc: Teledoc (phonetic version)

Video: YouTube.com/Sypris Solutions

Follow Rep. Bill Kristol on Twitter: @BillKristol

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