Vaccine against flu – three months of testing in 100 countries

If your child has fevers and vomiting symptoms after getting an average amount of flu virus in their nose/mouth then there is good news. The company behind a new vaccine, called COVID-19, has successfully…

Vaccine against flu - three months of testing in 100 countries

If your child has fevers and vomiting symptoms after getting an average amount of flu virus in their nose/mouth then there is good news. The company behind a new vaccine, called COVID-19, has successfully packaged and shipped the product after three months of intensive testing.

The vaccine, which aims to combat influenza A, can be administered to anyone aged two to 17. It is not yet licensed but the vaccine was licensed for use on children in a very large scale by the European Medicines Agency in September.

Some 40 percent of Britons and 49 percent of Australians who got flu last year got it by having flu symptoms in their nose/mouth, according to new figures from Flu Research Australia.

The infectious disease epidemiologist called it a “staggering result” which may be the result of people catching the flu from infected hands or surfaces.

The survey of nearly 4,000 people across Australia found people had given out more than 40 million handshakes and shared 30 million surface objects with other people last year.

NHS England confirmed that any over-the-counter anti-flu products are recommended as at least one of several options for anyone with flu symptoms and not just a sore throat.

COVID-19 was developed by research pharmaceutical company, the Ronckan Group, using AVIATOR technology. The research was carried out by scientists at Goldsmiths University, London, and GlaxoSmithKline UK.

“AVIATOR technology is particularly suitable because it’s very effective at combating seasonal influenza strains,” says Rachael Keshin, a researcher in the Ronckan Group.

Keshin and her colleagues tested the COVID-19 vaccine and found that it performed well in children as well as adults last year in tests that lasted for up to three months.

In testing it was found to be as effective as a day-four booster for influenza that is usually given at the end of a flu season.

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